To help you get started on your quest for healing, I have presented some basic questions that you may be asking yourself, and have linked some initial information to the question. (The question will be linked to the article by clicking over it. An excerpt from the article may follow each question or, I may just link the article to the question if a small excerpt does not address it satisfactorily.) After you find out what interests you, continue down the page to view a list of links provided by others from the message board to see if the topic you are interested in is reflected there. If not, you will likely have a good place to start after reading the article provided. It is important to remember that the research provided is not necessarily (nor likely) 100% accurate, and further research will be necessary to convince you of it’s validity. Also, thyroid research is moving quickly, therefore causing what seems like “good” information now, to become outdated and inaccurate over time. So, it is important to continue your research as new information is uncovered.

Is there truth to the idea that autoantibodies are recycled every 120 days?

Patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, an autoimmune disorder responsible for most instances of hypothyroidism, do not have constant levels of destructive autoantibodies. Nor do patients with Graves’ disease. Like most autoantibodies, these IgG immunoglobulins only last about 120 days. New antibodies are formed at a rate proportional to the immune system’s response. How can these patients be expected to thrive on one standard thyroid hormone replaement dose or one dose of anti-thyroid drugs while their immune status is ignored? Furthermore, dying thyroid cells, especially after radioiodine ablation, release thyroid hormone and autoantibodies. This causes transient symptoms of hyperthyroidism, although in some cases these symptoms may persist for longer than one year. No wonder many hypothyroid patients feel hyper one minute and hypo the next.

How commonly do people develop other autoimmune problems?

…having one autoimmune disease increases your risk slightly of developing another autoimmune condition.

Is it true that vaccinations may contribute to Hashimoto’s Disease? (Although this article reflects an animal study, I think it is a significant account of how it may effect humans)

….. In dogs as well as humans, the body sometimes forms antibodies against itself (self antigens) which can lead to diseases of the pancreas (diabetes), thyroid (Hashimoto’s Disease), collagen and fibronectin (Scleroderma, Lupus),cardiolipin (Cardiomyopathy), etc. The body literally attacks itself to cause the autoimmune disease.

The vaccinated group developed significant levels of autoantibodies against: fibronectin, laminin, DNA, albumin, Cytochrome C, transferrin, cardiolipin, collagen. The responses varied among individual animals, probably reflecting genetic differences. The clinical significance of those autoantibodies remains to be determined, but speculation must be that something in the vaccines is one of the etiologies (in the genetically susceptible dog) of such diseases as Cardiomyopathy, Lupus Erythematosus, Glomerulonephritis, etc. I apologize for using these technical terms but this is a complex study and adds validity to the report.

THYROID SYMPTOMS LINKS

Do At Home Thyroid Test

Do you feel so bad that you know something’s wrong….

Are You Tired? Low Thyroid May Be The Culprit

The Hashimoto’s Brain?

Introduction to Candida

“HASHIMOTO’S ENCEPHALITIS” ?

Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy

DIET AND SUPPLEMENTS LINKS

Food as described in Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon (Click here for the book)

Holistic Healing for Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

The Scoop on Sugar (For more information, click here for the book “Sugar Blues”)

The Celiac/Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Connection

HEALTH HAZARD LINKS

Migraine Headaches and MSG

Chemical Cuisine

Aspartame is Poison! Don’t use it!

What Every Hypothyroid Patient Should Know about Synthroid

THYROID MEDICATION AND DOCTOR LINKS

Doctors who prescribe Armour Thyroid

Doctors who treat Wilson’s Thyroid Syndrome

Solved: Some Common Thyroid Problems (Perhaps the best book on Thyroid – Solved: The Riddle of Illness)

Why do you insist on Synthroid instead of Armour – a patient’s letter

Thyroid Drug Websites/Information Page

MISCELLANEOUS LINKS

Thyroid Success Stories

Print Friendly